CSR as Standards and Reporting

Logo of Global Reporting Initiative

Last week I had a short blog about stakeholder engagement and some of the events leading up to the tendency for businesses and organizations to look beyond clients and suppliers. But in order to be effective a systematic approach is needed that will enable organizations to categorize and absorb the knowledge gained from a more outgoing approach.

Other forms of stakeholder engagement can come through compliance and reporting on the corporations’ ability to conform to certain standards. There are many good reasons why corporations engage on compliance strategies. The main arguments are:

  1. Stamp of approval through accreditation
  2. Attractiveness to social responsible investors, and
  3. Branding the company as a social responsible member of the community (Locke et al, 2006:1f).

Initiatives such as Global Compact (GC), Global Reporting Initiative (GRI) or the supplementary Principles for Responsible Investments (PRI), enables companies to increase their transparency level (United Nations Global Compact, 2008, UNEP Finance Initiatives, 2005, Global Reporting Initiative, 2006). Some of these initiatives are sponsored by the United Nations (UN) and thereby giving companies that abide to the standards, a stamp of approval from a world recognised institution. Other standards organisations are private or semi-governmental institutions that have created systems for governing sustainable behaviour as for example systems issued by the International Organisation for Standardization[1].

Systems can also be grouped by industry or be customized to the individual company where they are called Code of Conduct or similar systems. Common for Codes of Conduct are that they in some form are linked to universal agreed treaties such as the human rights, labour standards or environmental agreements. There are, however, some drawbacks in relying too heavily on these systems. A company like e.g. Nike has adopted a comprehensive Code of Conduct system of standards and control which both rely on internal and external auditing, but has found that this does not safeguard the company from criticism on labour standards in its supply chain (Locke et al, 2006). The lessons learned from Nike is that standards and systems should not stand alone but should be complimented by other forms of stakeholder engagement such as joint training with suppliers and frequent meeting activities both formal and socially to increase cultural exchange between the parties (Locke & Romis, 2006).

The second driver for stakeholder engagement can be the access to social responsible investors. While only a few years ago the Social Responsible Investments (SRI) constituted a fraction of the total investment portfolio it was in 2008 representing investments of over 18 trillion USD (UNEP Finance Initiatives, 2005). For many companies it can be a benefit to be part of a SRI portfolio as it gives access to funds that other companies might not have access to. In addition, the system of control and auditing can enable the company to streamline its processes and get rid of organisational risk that might affect long-term profitability. Investigations into the link between profitability and CSR shows that companies that rate their CSR effort positively also have a significant better financial performance than companies that does not (Economist, 2008:6).

The third reason for adopting a compliance strategy is the potential for positive branding. The GC is now consisting of approximately 5000 companies (United Nations Global Compact, 2008) from around the world. Grouping with other well-branded businesses who subscribe to the GC standard can boost their corporate brand and increase the collective brand value of all. Other companies use CSR actively to differentiate themselves in an otherwise competitive market.

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One thought on “CSR as Standards and Reporting

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