A Measure of Success – CSR Business Intelligence

It would seem that we have been over this a thousand times before… What gets measured gets managed. It was true when we invented TQM in the 80’ties and LEAN in the 90’ties and while we seem to forget about basic management skills when we adopt network organisation and self-empower our employees it is still true that if you can stick a number to your performance there is a much better chance that improvements follow close behind.

My good friend Michael Koploy have for a number of years been working with evaluation and documentation of CSR performance. As I he has realised that with CSR comes complexity on a scale that is mind-blowing. For TQM, LEAN and other quality management systems there were at least boundaries that was relatively narrow outlook defined by customers, suppliers, competitors and employees, but with CSR there are no scope.

So how do you work with CSR data, how do you get your hands on it and how can you present it in a way that gives meaning to decision makers and stakeholders. Michael has adopted an approach that might work and builds on some of the fundamentals of TQM and at the same time takes into account that the world (and organisations with it) is always changing. Build on three basic principles with data as “King”.

First – Automate and improve data collection to get a better picture of corporate sustainability;

Companies generate millions of data points every day and as time of progressed much of these systems have been integrated into various systems like SAP or other Business Intelligence (BI) structures. Finance, HR and operations have for a long time used these systems in order to improve their processes and it is high time that CSR professionals do the same.

Second – Use analytics applications to find trends and make informed decisions;

The graphic integration that comes with advanced BI systems can prove to be even more useful when it comes to sustainability performance. Often we see fragments of a total effort displayed in the CSR report or through corporate announcements and newsletters. But what we really need to specialised and specific information that is valuable to the individual stakeholder. For instance if I’m interested in anti-corruption issues I would like to be able to access the policies related to the issue but also audit reports and key performance indicators tracked in real time. What I do not need is a general understanding that this or that company is working actively to reduce corruption in its supply chain I want to know the “how”.

Third – Develop sustainability teams that are data-minded and accountable for business decisions.

The Crap-in-Crap-out principle is of cause also applicable when it comes t CSR Data gathering, reporting and presentation. So when data have to be managed it is done by people who know what they are doing and not by some random employee who have little or no knowledge about a given subject. A team approach works because it forces us to articulate our assumptions about how the world works and enables us to be challenged on our views. Within the field of CSR there are many opinions about what is the right thing to do and how its should be done, so instead of just having one person deciding a team of people agree and are accountable for the approach.

Data is not only king when it comes to CSR it is central, but not without the right people and approach to come with to terms with sometimes difficult to comprehend facts about the organisations that we work with. Data and data processing can unveil truths about an organisation which calls for hard decisions and sometimes for managers to change their perception of right and wrong. But without a common BI platform we will never get close to realising the knowledge that we can gain from systematic and comprehendible CSR data approach.

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